10 Comments

  1. aucuneimportance

    What’s the difference with using \ensuremath{\alpha}

    Any way, what’s the problem with typing $\beta$ everytime ?

    • Hi there,

      The main advantage probably is that you don’t have to worry about font style (e.g. bold), it works just like for normal text. Also, the letters are not in italics by default. Other than that, I think you are right, it’s a personal choice whether you prefer switching to math mode or using the textgreek package.
      By the way, for bold symbols in math mode use:

      \usepackage{bm}
      ...
      $\boldsymbol{\beta}$

      Ensuremath has it’s own problems (see here for a discussion), but is also a valid choice in most cases.

      Best, Tom.

  2. ABC

    Great guide! I will use it from now on! But…

    I am having trouble using this with \usepackage[sc]{mathpazo} that I put to use the Palatino font.

    Greek letters (e.g., \textbeta)
    (1) look ugly and pixelated (when zoomed in)
    (2) are not modified by \textbf and such
    (3) are not similar to the Palatino font

    If I remove the mathpazo package everything works (but I get the standard LaTeX font).

    Does anyone know a workaround for this? I know (3) is not the packages fault, but I would love to have upright greek fonts Palatino-like.

    Thanks

  3. Marie Hoffmann

    Was wondering a long time, whether this would be possible. Thanks!
    Noticed, that the optional package is named “artemisia”, not “anthemisia” like written above.

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